Book chapters are like articles except that they are constrained by the topic of a book.

Sometimes, ”Books serve to show a man [sic] that those original thoughts of his [sic] are not very new after all." 

-- Abraham Lincoln

Pages 218-36 in Lois K. Fuller Dow, Craig A. Evans, and Andrew W. Pitts, eds., The Language and Literature of the New Testament: Essays in Honor of Stanley E. Porter’s 60th Birthday (Biblical Interpretation Series 150; Leiden: Brill, 2016)

There is continual scholarly discussion and debate today regarding the languages spoken and used in the multilingual speech community of first-century Palestine. The scholarly proposals are many, but there is an increasing awareness among biblical scholars that Greek would have been the primary and prestige language and the lingua franca of that ancient speech community. My objective is to discuss the Greek hypothesis, focusing on the issue of method, as I simultaneously dialogue with one recent article that also speaks about the topic. 

Pages 118-38 in Stanley E. Porter and Sean A. Adams, eds., Pillars in the History of Biblical Interpretation, Volume 1: Prevailing Methods before 1980 (McMaster Divinity College Press, Biblical Studies Series 2; Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2016)

This article presents F. C. Baur’s life and works and the historical theological context of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that served as the contextual background of his thoughts and ideas. More specifically, it articulates three critical components that constitute the epistemological framework of Baur’s historical method, Tendenzkritik.

Pages 291-318 in Stanley E. Porter and Sean A. Adams, eds., Pillars in the History of Biblical Interpretation, Volume 2: Prevailing Methods after 1980 (McMaster Divinity College Press, Biblical Studies Series 2; Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2016) (co-authored with Stanley E. Porter)

This essay notes the works of two influential scholars whose contribution to New Testament scholarship and modern linguistics has been substantial. The combined work of Eugene A. Nida (1916‒2011) and Johannes P. Louw (1932‒2013) not only engendered the production of hundreds of scholarly publications, but also affected several important areas of scholarly research The lives and scholarly careers of these two scholars have much in common, and it is not difficult to see the significant overlap in their work. Their common interests culminated in their joint project, the Greek–English Lexicon of the New Testament: Based on Semantic Domains, which was published in 1988.

Pages 309-338 in Stanley E. Porter, Gregory P. Fewster, and Christopher D. Land, eds., Modeling Biblical Language: Selected Papers from the McMaster Divinity College Linguistics Circle (Linguistic Biblical Studies 13; Leiden: Brill, 2016)

This study suggests the abandonment of the traditional notion of spiritual gifts as a technical term that refers to identifiable catalogues of gifts, ministries, or items that God bestows on individuals for their exercise in the church. The proposal is that the term spiritual gifts should be seen more broadly and generally as simply gifts of/from the Holy Spirit, without having any technical or conceptual meaning.

Pages 119-38 in Stanley E. Porter and David I. Yoon, eds., Paul and Gnosis (Pauline Studies 9; Leiden: Brill, 2016)

By analyzing the sociolinguistic contexts of situation of 1 and 2 Timothy, this study argues that it is inaccurate to say that Paul was only combating a singular opponent in the Pastorals or that the so-called Ephesian heresy can be pigeonholed into a neatly identified type of false doctrine or teaching. 

Pages 1-8 in Stanley E. Porter and Hughson T. Ong, eds., The Origins of John’s Gospels (Johannine Studies 2; Leiden: Brill, 2015) (co-authored with Stanley E. Porter)

Questions concerning the origins of John's Gospel continue to intrigue scholars engaged in the field, and this introductory chapter summarizes the content and main contribution of each essay in The Origins of John's Gospel.

Pages 101-23 in Stanley E. Porter and Hughson T. Ong, eds., The Origins of John’s Gospels (Johannine Studies 2; Leiden: Brill, 2015)

This essay examines the Johannine community and argues for a via media view in the Gospel community debate. It demonstrates, using the sociolinguistic theory of "community of practice," that the Johannine community was a special community that had its own unique characteristics, yet it also shared things in common with the larger Christian community of the first century.

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